It's Germane

The John Jermain Library's Weblog


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If you love great books and dishes they’ve made famous…..

Jacket.aspx …you’ll love this little book. Photographic interpretations of culinary moments from great literature are paired with text from the book which inspired them. When Oliver Twist dared to ask “Please, sir I want some more” we imagine what his bowl of porridge looked like. When Melville’s Queequeg and Ishmael eat creamy New England clam chowder, we envision a steamy bowl of tasty stew. Author Dinah Fried prepared and photographed fifty memorable dishes described in literature and created the charming book “Fictitious Dishes: An Album of Literature’s Most Memorable Meals.” From Daphne Du Maurier’s “Rebecca,” Fried recreates…..”Those dripping crumpets, I can see them now. Tiny crisp wedges of toast, and piping-hot, flaky scones. Sandwiches of unknown nature, mysteriously flavored and quite delectable, and that very special gingerbread.” Try it you’ll like it! chowder3crumpetsberries toast3-1 gruel2


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Alex, by Pierre Lemaitre

Alex, by Pierre Lamaitre

Alex, by Pierre Lamaitre

Alex is a great example of crime fiction and suspense.  Its is graphic and gritty, so the reader does need to be prepared for intensely violent imagery.  However, the twists and turns of the plot are better than a roller-coaster.  It starts with a young woman being abducted off a city street, the eye-witness account of a bystander being the only evidence of the crime.  The investigation into her identity parallels her torture, and reveals a deeply disturbing past.  Awkward ending aside, this is a must read for fans of crime fiction.


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On this day, 75 Years Ago….

marion On April 9, 1939 an historic musical event took place on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. On the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, Marion Anderson sang to an audience of 75,000 people after being denied access to Constitution Hall by the DAR (who owned the Hall) because of their white-only artist policy. Years later, Marion Anderson did sing at Constitution Hall; by that time the DAR had apologized and had changed its rules. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mAONYTMf2pk


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Outlander, by Diana Gabaldon

Outlander, by Diana Gabaldon

Outlander, by Diana Gabaldon

Outlander, by Diana Gabaldon is a fantastic book that manages to cross multiple genres.  The story is two parts historical fiction, one part fantasy, one part romance with a generous dollop of action/adventure.  The author deftly weaves the multiple facets of this story into a lively romp through time as the heroine, Claire Du Champ is hurtled from 1946  to 1743 in the Scottish highlands.  The author’s astute sense of humor and intelligent research are counter-balanced with graphic imagery of romance and violence.  Outlander is such an entertaining read that it is difficult to put down!  Highly recommended.


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The Crane Wife, by Patrick Ness

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This is a gently captivating story that integrates bits and pieces of the fairy tale with the contemporary world.  It includes an odd mixture of characters who are fantastically flawed and loveable.  The mixture of artistry, sweetness and tragedy are an inescapable delight.  I’m already thinking I’d like to reread it.  Highly recommend this for anyone who is a fan of fairy tales, love stories or the quirky artist.

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